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Northwest Trek News
May 23, 2023

Our newest member of the Northwest Trek family is garter snake Matcha! Garter snakes are one of Washington’s most common snake species. They typically enjoy habitats such as meadows and forests that are near water. Matcha is adjusting well to her new home, which features small logs, a pool, and plenty of vegetation she can move around and hide in. While at Northwest Trek, she can eat a varied diet of insects, earthworms, mice, slugs and even small fish. Stop by and say hi to Matcha next time you visit the Cheney Discovery Center behind Kids’ Trek!

May 09, 2023

Did you know skunks are seen often in Washington state? If you haven’t spotted one yet, you’ll soon be able to see one at Northwest Trek Wildlife Park! Coming to us from Smithsonian’s National Zoo, Sundew is a male striped skunk. He’s a year old and adjusting well to his new home. Already showing us his playful personality, Sundew loves strawberries and carrots. But he’s been known to leave his veggies for last. After a short-term quarantine, our veterinary staff brought Sundew into the health clinic for his wellness exam. During his exam, Sundew had routine blood work done to …

Apr 19, 2023

Caring for our animals, habitats, park grounds, and guests at Northwest Trek Wildlife Park requires hours of hard work and dedication – not only from our dedicated staff but also from our generous volunteers. For National Volunteer Week, we want to extend a tremendous thank you to our hard-working volunteers who have donated their time and expertise. Looking back at 2022, our volunteers logged 7,318 hours! Broken down by area, we saw: 3,790 in Animal Care 259 in Conservation 2,225 in Nature Engagement 510 in Horticulture and Maintenance As a result of their time, our animals received extra enrichment and …

Apr 06, 2023

Giving a health exam to the top feline predator in the Pacific Northwest takes a team of dedicated professionals – something our cougar Carly has here at Northwest Trek. Carly’s team has worked extensively with her for years to ensure exams run smoothly and safely. Carly’s predator status, size, and nature make getting to the exam room slightly different. Through training (and plenty of treats), Carly will now voluntarily take injections to initiate her sedation. She finds a comfortable resting place in her “bedroom” and lets the medicine take effect. Once it’s safe, the veterinary team led by Dr. Allison …

Mar 27, 2023

The signs of spring are here. Flowers are blooming. Trees are green, and the weather is warmer. At Northwest Trek Wildlife Park, we also have another sign to celebrate. Our black bears and grizzlies begin to emerge from torpor and let us know spring is indeed here! What is Torpor? We visited Keeper Haley to get the details. Torpor is a form of hibernation. True hibernation means an animal’s body shuts down and it goes dormant. An example is some species of frogs and bats; they have no activity in the winter. Torpor is a reduction in activity. It comes …

Mar 23, 2023

What species of amphibians are thriving in the Pacific Northwest? One way to find out is to locate and identify their egg masses, and March is a perfect month to get outside and search. A 4-acre wetland mitigation site in a behind-the-scenes area of Northwest Trek is where this search frequently occurs. “This is an ideal place for monitoring egg masses,“ says Northwest Trek’s Conservation Program Coordinator Rachael. “Since the wetland’s restoration, we’ve identified eggs from seven of the eight monitored species of stillwater-breeding amphibians.” From previous years, we know the first few weeks of March are typically the best …

Mar 14, 2023

Even the mightiest birds under our care have routine health exams to ensure they remain in great shape. For the bald eagles, Sequoia, Sucia, Salish, and Cheveyo, this was preventative medicine in action. Having healthy birds allows Head Veterinarian Dr. Allison Case to focus on their continued wellness.  Keepers and the veterinary staff work seamlessly together to take each eagle to the veterinary clinic for exams. It’s a two-day process, and the team starts with Salish and Sucia. Sequoia and Cheveyo have their exams on the second day. Each bird traveled to the clinic fully awake, and after a careful, …

Jan 26, 2023

Three orphaned moose calves, named Atlas, Luna, and Callisto, recently made their public debut at Northwest Trek Wildlife Park. The moose, all born last spring, were rescued after being orphaned in Alaska. They arrived at Northwest Trek in August and have been living off-exhibit and adjusting to their new Eatonville home. “Our veterinarian and animal care team have built strong bonds with these calves, getting to know them as a group and as individuals,” Zoological Curator Marc Heinzman said. “These trusting relationships will help us continue to provide the best possible care for them as they grow up.” When the …

Jan 09, 2023

Valentine’s Day is just around the corner and love is in the air at Northwest Trek Wildlife Park! There’s no concrete way to measure an animal’s love but many of the animals at Northwest Trek are coupled up, or longtime companions, and enjoy each other’s company. Of course, Valentine’s Day isn’t just for couples- it’s about celebrating friendship and family, too! Grizzlies Bromance. Bro-entines (like, galentines). Brotherly love. Whatever you want to call it, grizzly bears Hawthorne and Huckleberry have it. While not technically brothers, they both arrived to Northwest Trek as cubs around the same age, orphaned in the …

Dec 19, 2022

Another spin around the sun – what a year it has been! Northwest Trek Wildlife Park welcomed and provided homes to three orphaned moose calves and partnered to help conserve wild bat and northern leopard frog populations, among so many other moments. Thanks for being on this journey with us. Enjoy our best photos of 2022, taken by staff photographer Katie Cotterill. Northwest Trek is home to one of the largest bat colonies in the South Puget Sound region. We partnered with scientists to help protect wild bats from white-nose syndrome. Amphibian egg masses were monitored at our four-acre wetland …