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Northwest Trek News
Feb 23, 2022

Birch, a beloved moose at Northwest Trek Wildlife Park, died yesterday after a sudden and severe decline in his health. Dr. Allison Case, the wildlife park’s veterinarian, said the 8-month-old moose was showing signs of lethargy and severe gastro-intestinal disease Monday. His veterinary and animal care teams intervened immediately with medical treatment. When his condition didn’t improve yesterday, Birch was moved to the on-site animal hospital for more intensive care and diagnostic testing. Birch died under anesthesia as his intensive medical treatments were concluding, said Dr. Case. “Birch was adored by everyone who knew him and we are devastated to …

Feb 18, 2022

The word “enrichment” is said dozens of times a day around Northwest Trek Wildlife Park. As in, “we have the enrichment ready for the otters” or “Aspen the moose really seemed to enjoy her enrichment today” or “we need to create the beavers’ enrichment this afternoon.” Providing enriching experiences is a vital part of providing high-quality animal care at Northwest Trek- but what exactly is enrichment? “Enrichment items are things like food, smells or toys that enhance the health and well-being of the animals in our care,” said Haley, animal keeper and coordinator of the Behavioral Husbandry Committee at Northwest …

Feb 10, 2022

Sequoia, a 4-year-old bald eagle at Northwest Trek, is nearing full maturity, gradually getting that signature smooth white head, dark black coat and white tail feathers. Bald eagles reach adulthood at 5 years old. Until then, their feathers go through a series of changes. Most notable: their dark brown belly and wings have specks of white and their “white bald head” is brown, unlike the iconic images of a fully-grown eagle. Sequoia’s head is a cookies-and-cream color now – a mix of brown and white feathers. Her eyes and beak are also changing, from brown to golden. Take a look …

Feb 07, 2022

The world’s best athletes are going for gold in the Olympic Games this month. But you don’t need to go to Beijing to see animals with incredible physical traits and abilities… you just need to visit Northwest Trek! SHORT TRACK SPEED SKATING Short track speed skaters can reach an average speed of 31 mph- that’s about as fast as a bobcat can run! SKI JUMPING Ski jumpers can travel over 300 feet in the air. For comparison, cougars can leap up to 40 feet horizontally (and that’s without flying off a jump!). FIGURE SKATING Wolverines have snowshoe-like paws that allow …

Feb 07, 2022

“If a big hungry moose comes to visit, you might give him a muffin to make him feel at home. If you give him a muffin, he’ll want some jam to go with it. When he’s eaten all your muffins, he’ll want to go to the store to get some more muffin mix…” You know the famous children’s book by Laura Numeroff. But… what if you give a moose a carrot? “If you give Birch a carrot, he listens really well!” explains keeper Jordan. “And chances are if you give him a carrot, he’ll want some lettuce to go with …

Jan 28, 2022

Valentine’s Day is just around the corner and love is in the air at Northwest Trek Wildlife Park! There’s no concrete way to measure an animal’s love but many of the animals at Northwest Trek are coupled up, or longtime companions, and enjoy each other’s company. Of course, Valentine’s Day isn’t just for couples- it’s about celebrating friendship and family, too! Swans Trumpeter swans mate for life, and the current pair in Northwest Trek’s 435-acre Free-Roaming Area are no exception. Rescued with wing injuries that left them unable to fly, they are always by each other’s side, waddling or swimming …

Jan 28, 2022

Being native to the Pacific Northwest, the animals at Northwest Trek don’t seem to mind the colder winter weather. But the snowy owls at the park don’t just put up with it, they thrive in it. Tundra, a male, and Taiga, a female, embrace these cooler temperatures and it shows. “They’re more active at this time of year and we notice a big increase in their food drive,” said keeper Miranda Mauck. “Their favorite food is mice!” In the wild, snowy owls live near beaches and fields in the winter in Alaska and Canada… brrr! Now you see me, now …

Jan 12, 2022

Brrr! You can feel the chill in the air as the temperature drops. You’re likely pulling out your winter coats, if you haven’t already! Many of the animals at the wildlife park also have their winter coats ready and are well-prepared for the colder weather. Wolverines Wolverines are made for the cold- and our wolverines Rainier and Ahma are no exception. Wolverines are well-adapted for winter living, with extremely dense fur, large snowshoe-like paws that allow them to stay on top of deep snow and crampon-like claws that enable them to climb up and over steep cliffs and snow-covered peaks. …

Dec 20, 2021

What a year this has been! Northwest Trek Wildlife Park won top honors in Association of Zoos & Aquariums’ 2021 Exhibit Award for Eagle Passage, head-started and released hundreds of endangered northern leopard frogs back into the wild, welcomed a new moose calf and celebrated the birth of a mountain goat kid, among so many other moments. Thanks for being here on this journey with us. Enjoy our best photos of 2021, taken by staff photographer Katie Cotterill. Northwest Trek won a national award for the Eagle Passage exhibit. Northwest Trek welcomed a five-month-old moose calf named Birch to the …

Dec 06, 2021

Just in time to burn off some of that winter break energy, Northwest Trek Wildlife Park is opening daily for a week at the end of December (Dec. 26-Jan. 2) for the return of “Winter Wildland.” Guests to the wildlife park are invited to watch in delight as animals play with holiday-themed treats and enrichments. Guests can walk the paved pathways laced with winter magic and decorations and see native Northwest animals like bald eagles, grizzly bears, gray wolves and river otters. For weeks, Northwest Trek staff have been busy as Santa’s elves, making festive cardboard cutouts and wrapped gifts, …