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Tag: free roaming area

Jun 13, 2024

A group of us climbs into the open-air green Jeep at Northwest Trek Wildlife Park in Eatonville. We know the Keeper Adventure Tour will be memorable, and we are eager to go off-road and get up close with the bison, elk, mountain goats, and other free-roaming animals. “Hi, I’m Sunni and will be your tour guide,” says the enthusiastic keeper. “All the animals you’ll see today can be found in Washington and the Pacific Northwest, which is super cool.” When Sunni is not guiding Keeper Adventure Tours, she cares for the animals that call the 435-acre Free-Roaming Area of the …

May 20, 2024

Happy 2nd birthday to our rescued moose, Calli and Luna! The female moose have come a long way, and they celebrated with an out-of-this-world party. Keepers made them space-themed enrichments and fresh leafy bouquets for browsing!          

Mar 18, 2024

The birds are chirping, flowers are blooming, and the sun is shining. But there’s so much more that points to Spring at Northwest Trek Wildlife Park. CHESTNUT IS AWAKE In early March, Chestnut the hoary marmot came out of his underground hibernation den. Guests can now see him running around his habitat. Before Chestnut went into hibernation in December, he weighed around 10 pounds. Now, he weighs about 8.5 pounds. Hoary marmots eat vast amounts of meadow vegetation, including sedges and lupine. In the wild, the thick layers of fat they develop allow them to survive eight to nine months …

Mar 06, 2024

The keepers at Northwest Trek Wildlife Park feed nearly 200 animals a day. It takes specific science to prepare proper diets for all the different animals. Each animal’s diet is balanced based on species, age, and health-related issues. We asked the keepers for some of the most fascinating food facts that came to mind. “The black bears and grizzly bears have quite drastic changes in their diet, depending on the season,” said keeper Carly. “In the summer, they eat a wide variety of fish, fruits, and leafy greens as they prepare for their metabolisms to slow for their winter torpor naps. …

Mar 01, 2024

For many, it’s a late-winter hobby, but for the keepers in Northwest Trek Wildlife Park’s 435-acre Free-Roaming Area, it’s just another part of their job: shed hunting. The bull (male) elk are beginning to drop their antlers—a yearly occurrence that happens a few months after breeding season due to a decrease in testosterone. “We’ve already seen some impressively large antlers drop,” said assistant curator Dave. When a bull elk drops its antlers, they immediately begin growing a new set. “Antler grows faster than any other bone,” said Dave. “During the summer months, bull elk antlers can grow up to ¾ …

Feb 12, 2024

February 29th is the hoppiest day of the year! Frogs, cats, goats, and more. We’re celebrating our leaping and jumping creatures this Leap Day. Cougar Cougars are powerful runners, leapers, and climbers. They can leap higher than any other mammal and have been recorded making a vertical jump of over 20 feet from a stationary position. Look for Carly, the cougar on the cat loop. BOBCATS Bobcats are also impressive jumpers. They can leap up to 10 feet high in the air. Look for bobcats Tanner and Tahoma on the cat loop. FROGS Some frogs can jump over 20 times their body …

Feb 06, 2024

Valentine’s Day is just around the corner, and love is in the air at Northwest Trek Wildlife Park. There’s no concrete way to measure an animal’s love, but many of the animals at Northwest Trek are coupled up or longtime companions and enjoy each other’s company. Of course, Valentine’s Day isn’t just for couples- it’s about celebrating friendship and family, too! Moose “Moose are generally solitary animals, but our three moose calves love being in their own micro-herd,” said keeper Jordan. “They are seldom seen alone and prefer to forage, go on walks, swim, play in the meadows, and even …

Dec 18, 2023

As another year ends, we reflect on the special moments Northwest Trek Wildlife Park had the privilege of being a part of in 2023. We raised and released hundreds of endangered northern leopard frogs into the wild, provided a new home to a hoary marmot, and helped Tacoma students develop empathy for wildlife through our award-winning Wildlife Champions program. Enjoy some of our favorite photos from this year, taken by staff photographer Katie Cotterill. Brothers gotta hug! Grizzly bears Huckleberry and Hawthorne hug during a wrestling play session. Mountain goat Klahhane sticks out his tongue. An elk calf stays close …

Dec 14, 2023

Ride the Jeep to the elk rut action.
Members $110 / Non-Members: $125

Dec 05, 2023

Brrr! You can feel the chill in the air as the temperature drops. You’re likely pulling out your winter coats, if you haven’t already! Many of the animals at the wildlife park also have their winter coats ready and are well-prepared for the colder weather. Wolverines Wolverines are made for the cold- and our wolverines Rainier and Ahma are no exception. Wolverines are well-adapted for winter living, with extremely dense fur, large snowshoe-like paws that allow them to stay on top of deep snow and crampon-like claws that enable them to climb up and over steep cliffs and snow-covered peaks. …